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Sep-08-2009 23:33printcomments

25 American War Dead

Emphasizing the contrast in the wars, 21 of the 25 servicemembers named in this report, died in Afghanistan.

25 Americans killed in the wars overseas, in Iraq and Afghanistan
The faces of the most recent 25 Americans killed in the wars overseas, in Iraq and Afghanistan.

(SALEM, Ore.) - The U.S. government has released the names of twenty five Americans who died in Afghanistan and Iraq between August 22nd and September 6th, 2009. The U.S. Army has paid the highest cost in both conflicts, with 21 soldiers accounted for. Three Marines died and one Navy Corpsman attached to the Marines was also killed.

The average age among the most recent 25 American military personnel killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, is 24.2; considerably younger than the average age of U.S. troops killed in previous reports.

On May 24th 2009, we reported the average age among 11 recent war casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan as 32. On June 21st 2009, we reported ahe average age of a group of 12 Americans killed in the wars overseas as 30. Two of those killed are over 40-years old and one was 52. 28.75 is the average age of the soldiers and Marines killed overseas who were referenced in a July 18th 2009 report.

The average age among the fallen is 25 in a more recent August 9th 2009 report, showing what appears to be an increasing trend in the often deadly role for younger members of the U.S. military. There are similarities when reviewing the age trends of the Vietnam War.

That war claimed more twenty-year old's than any other age group.

20 of the 21 who died in Afghanistan lost their lives as a result of contact with the enemy. One death there was accidental. Of the four who died in Iraq, two Oregon soldiers died in combat, and two soldiers were lost in a vehicle rollover crash.

The fighting in Afghanistan is fierce at the current time. Deaths in Iraq have tapered greatly in recent weeks and months, since the U.S. withdrawal from certain areas of Iraq began.

We know that four American Marines were killed while fighting in a northern Afghan province. The DoD has not released their names at the time of this writing.

Take these names and images very seriously. Respect the dead and always maintain a degree of honor for your nation's warriors. These individuals will missed by their families and friends for a long time.

25 Casualties

Staff Sergeant Michael C. Murphrey, 25, of Snyder, Texas, died September 6 in Paktika province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device.

Anchorage television station KTUU reports at least five Fort Richardson paratroopers have died in Afghanistan in the last three weeks.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Fort Richardson, Alaska.

Sergeant Randy M. Haney, 27, of Orlando, Florida, died September 6 in Nangarhar, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit using small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fires.

The Orlando Sentinel reports that the 27-year old soldier was on his third tour of duty in the Middle East when his vehicle was attacked early Sunday in Nangarhar Province in eastern Afghanistan. Randy was reportedly sitting in the back of a Humvee at the rear of the convoy and was killed instantly when guns and rocket-propelled grenades were fired by enemy forces who ambushed the Americans.

Randy's mother, Amanda Macy, explains that her son was the unofficial morale booster in his unit. She says that when Rancy received a care package from home, he donated the candy to Afghan children.

He was assigned to the 2nd Special Troops Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colorado.

2nd Lieutenant Darryn D. Andrews, 34, of Dallas, Texas, died September 4 in Paktika Province, Afghanistan.

The Department of Defense reports that 2nd Lt. Andrews died from wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device and a rocket-propelled grenade.

The Anchorage Daily News provided these details: Darryn Andrews and six other soldiers were hit by the RPG while they were "trying to recover their vehicle, which had been struck by an improvised explosive device." According to the Army, Andrews enlisted in June 2004.

Darryn Andrews was assigned to 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Fort Richardson, Alaska.

Marine Lance Corporal Christopher S. Baltazar Jr., 19, of San Antonio, Texas, died September 3 while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

Chris's friend Samantha left this message on his MySpace page: "From the moment i met you i knew you were someone special. from your crazy personality to your big smile, i knew you were someone who always made everyone smile and be happy. there were many times i was sad and seeing you at colorguard practice and you being crazy made it all worth it. you always made my day brighter. i never thought i would see the day when you would be taken from us, and now that the day has come i'm lost for words."

His friend Miranda Bazany wrote, "Hey chris, my brother from another mother, its crazy to think that you are gone and i can't quite imagine this world without you. You are such a great person and the best friend anyone could ever have. I know you died doing what you love and you will continue protecting us as you watch from your spot in heaven. I miss you, and never got to say goodbye. We love you, i love you. Keep us safe and all those in the war protect."

L/Cpl Baltazar was assigned to 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Benjamin P. Castiglione, 21, of Howell, Michigan, died September 3 while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was a Navy Corpsman who was attached to a Marine Recon unit. There are few more integral roles in war than that of an Army medic or a Navy Corpsman.

One of his Marine friends wrote, "Semper Fi brother, Rest In Paradise Doc stand at ease and walk through heavens gates you won't ever be forgotten your a hero to the Marines and Sailors you served alongside with. See you one day soon doc Oorah!

And another simply wrote, "You will be forever remembered, brother, Semper Fidelis"

Benjamin's step brother Justin Adams wrote, "I am so sorry to say that Ben has passed away in Afganistan on Wednesday at 1:30 a.m. Please keep our family in your prayers and hearts. He will always be loved."

He was assigned to the 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Battalion.

Staff Sergeant Todd W. Selge, 25, of Burnsville, Minnesota, died September 3 in Baqubah, Iraq, of injuries sustained during a vehicle roll-over.

On a tribute site, the Patriot Guard Riders of South Texas wrote, "To the family and friends, of S/Sgt. Selge, I would like you to know that a lot of people pray for you, and my hope is that their prayers will give you the strength necessary to carry on. Just as you were always with him when he was deployed overseas, know that he will always be with you wherever you may be. In the days to follow, may you be strengthened by the fact that Ssgt. Selge was a man distinguished by exceptional courage and will always be admired for his brave deeds and noble qualities. You, your family and your sacrifice will never be forgotten."

"S/Sgt. Selge the flag of the United States of America has your blood sewn into the fabric; it shall wave forever in your honor."

He assigned to the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

Specialist Jordan M. Shay, 22, of Salisbury, Massachusetts died from injuries sustained in the same rollover crash September 3 in Baqubah, Iraq.

Daily Kos writes that Jordan Shay had just started the second week of his second deployment to Iraq, when he and his buddy and fellow infantryman Staff Sgt. Todd Selge, were killed when the vehicle in which they were riding fell 60 feet off a bridge.

Jordan is a 2005 graduate of Amesbury High School, was reportedly going to ask his longtime girlfriend, Kelsey, to marry him when he returned stateside, according to the Newburyport News.

He was assigned to the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Wash.

Specialist Tyler R. Walshe, 21, of Shasta California, died August 31 in southern Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device.

A friend he served with wrote this message on a tribute site, "Brother, it was an honor serving with you in Charlie Company."

Tyler Walshe's hometown of Shasta, California, is just west of Redding on Highway 299 near Whiskeytown Lake.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

Specialist Jonathan D. Welch, 19, of Yorba Linda, California died August 31 in Shuyene Sufia, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with an improvised explosive device.

“Maria and I are deeply saddened to learn of the death of Specialist Jonathan Welch. He fought courageously, putting himself in harm’s way as he served our country," Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said in a statement released Wednesday evening. "We join all Californians in remembering his commitment and sacrifice.”

Jonathan Welch joined the Army in March, 2007 and was stationed out of Fort Lewis, Wash. He was on his first deployment, and had been in Afghanistan since July.

The Associated Press reports that at least 49 U.S. troops died in Afghanistan last month, making August the deadliest months for troops since the American-led invasion in 2001.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

Private first-class Jordan M. Brochu, 20, of Cumberland, Maine, was also killed August 31 in Shuyene Sufia, Afghanistan. He died from injuries suffered during an enemy attack with a roadside bomb.

Jordan Brochu made a lasting impression during his senior year at Lake Region High School in Naples, his coaches told media outlets that they remember Jordan Brochu as a natural athlete. He played football, basketball and participated in field and track, surprising everyone with a real talent at throwing discus. His culinary arts teacher says Jordan brought that same enthusiasm into his classroom.

His parents live in Oakland, Maine, but Jordan spent his senior year attending a residential treatment program for troubled teens. His experiences at the high school helped him get back on track.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

Marine Lance Corporal David R. Hall, 31, of Elyria, Ohio, died August 31 while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

His sister, Lora Hall, said, "One of his duties was to go ahead of his unit and use a detector to check for bombs." David Hall had been on a foot patrol in Helmand province, where U.S. forces have been battling the Taliban, when he was killed by an improvised explosive device.

David Hall and his three older sisters grew up in Lorain. He played football for Southview High School in Lorain where he graduated in 1996, his family said.

Former Southview football coach Brian Joyner, who coached Hall during his senior year, remembered him as a "mentally tough" kid who had a good heart. He said Hall threw a 60-yard pass during a tryout.

"He was a kid who never threw a football, and he became our quarterback," Joyner said. "I still don't know what to say. I'm shocked."

He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Staff Sergeant Jason S. Dahlke, 29, of Orlando, Florida died August 29 in Paktika province, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained when he was shot by enemy forces August 28 while conducting combat operations.

It was Jason Dahlke's third deployment to Afghanistan, and his sixth overall. "It was what he wanted to do," Roger said of Jason's career as an Army Ranger. "We all knew the dangers and the risks."

Another soldier in the same regiment, Pfc. Eric W. Hario, 19, of Monroe, Michigan, died that day during the same firefight.

Jason was born November 8, 1979 in Tampa, Florida and raised in Jacksonville with his brother and three sisters. Even as a child, he was easy to get along with.

He was known for striking up conversations with his parents' friends, and hung out with peers who were outgoing like him.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia.

Private first-class Eric W. Hario, 19, of Monroe, Michigan, was killed during combat operations on August 29 in Paktika province, Afghanistan.

Soldiers with him that day say Eric was shot in the neck during a mission in the Paktika Province of Afghanistan. A medic attended to him immediately, but he died in the helicopter during emergency evacuation to a hospital.

"He always strived to be the best," Mrs. Hario said. "He wanted to be a Ranger because they're the best. Rangers all the way. He was on top of the world. He was always so sure of himself."

Two members of the military in dress uniforms approached the family home Saturday, where an American flag hangs near the front door. At first Mrs. Hario wasn't sure who the two dark figures were standing outside. She says as soon as she saw the dress uniforms, she knew. "They don't come to give you good news," she said. "It's not even real to us."

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia.

Specialist Abraham S. Wheeler III, 22, of Columbia, South Carolina, died August 28 in Logar province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device.

His aunt, Catherine Thomas, said, "He's a good boy. He was a good boy and I know that God knows what he's doing."

She says that for she and other family members, that idea has come to the ultimate test. Abraham, known to them as Rod, had been killed just two days ago. "I was sitting there and my brother called me and he told me he had bad news. When he told me, I was trying to hold myself together, but I couldn't, so I just fell apart," she says, "What was in my head was his being so young. His life is gone and he's just getting started."

Rod used the Army to start his adulthood. "He had it together, what he he wanted to do. He wanted to go to school, but he said he was going in the service and then when he came out, he would be able to go, knowing that he father couldn't send him," says Thomas.

His father, along with his mother and younger brother Travis, are leaning on extended family like Thomas. "We're a loving family. We love each other very much," she says.

He was assigned to the 3rd Squadron, 71st Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, New York.

Sergeant Earl D. Werner, 38, of Portland, Oregon, died August 28 in Rashid, Iraq, of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked the vehicle he and another Oregon soldier with an explosively formed penetrator.

Earl Werner was assigned to the 41st Special Troops Battalion, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the Oregon Army National Guard in Portland.

Sgt. Werner was on his third deployment with the Oregon National Guard. His first deployment was as part of the 2nd Battalion, 162 Infantry in 2004.

Later he deployed with the 234th Engineer Company in 2007 before transferring to the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team for deployment.

During his time with the Oregon National Guard, Werner was awarded the Bronze Star, two Army Commendation Medals and the Combat Action Badge.

He is survived by his wife Casey and son Charles, age 19 of the Amboy, Washington area.

The Battalion Commander, Lt. Col. Ken Nygren stated in a message from Iraq, "All the STB leadership were present to support our soldiers at the ramp ceremony in Iraq. It was a sad event, but very evident that the unit is very cohesive and still very proudly STB. They are serving Oregon and the nation well."

Private Taylor D. Marks, 19, of Monmouth, Oregon, also died August 28 in Rashid, Iraq, when an explosively formed penetrator struck the vehicle he was riding in.

The 2008 Central High School graduate earned a dean's scholarship to study at the University of Oregon, where he planned to enroll in the fall of 2010 to major in business with a Japanese minor. But he said he examined the financial realities and decided that joining the National Guard was the most prudent path to college.

"He didn't want to incur any debt, and he didn't want us to incur any debt," said his stepfather, Don Mack of Monmouth. "He came home and told us that he was going to join the Guard to help pay for his school. "I know it sounds cliché — a lot of parents say this — but that kid was far ahead of his time as far as using his brain."

Taylor Marks was assigned to the 41st Special Troops Battalion, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the Oregon Army National Guard in Portland.

Staff Sergeant Kurt R. Curtiss, 27, of Murray, Utah, died August 26 in Paktika Province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he was shot while his unit was supporting Afghan security forces during an enemy attack.

"He just wanted to make a difference," said his sister, Lynn Burr. "He wanted to help keep everybody safe, especially his family." Kurt Curtiss joined the Army the day after the terrorist attacks of 9/11. Ruth Serrano, his mother, told reporters that during the last eight years he deployed twice to Iraq and had been in Afghanistan nearly a year.

She explained that he loved his country and his service in the Army. Ruth Serrano last talked to her son several weeks ago. At that time, she says she had a sense-- a mother's intuition-- that danger was growing for him in Afghanistan.

"When he told me that he loved me, his voice quivered," said Serrano. "He had that quiver in his voice, and for some reason I just knew that something was wrong." When the family got the call from the Army two days ago, she says she knew immediately what had happened.

Kurt Curtiss was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, Fort Richardson, Alaska.

Private first-class Matthew E. Wildes, 18, of Hammond, Louisiana, died August 27 in Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his vehicle with an improvised explosive device.

His mother Mary Wildes said to a reporter, “He was a sweet kid.” “He didn’t like me saying that, but he was a kid. I treated him like a baby. But he was my baby.” Mary Wildes last spoke with her son the day before his death. They chatted on Myspace instant messenger, and Wildes told him she loved him but she didn’t want to waste his allotted 30 minutes on the computer.

Matthew joined the Army in April 2008 after his parents tried to talk him out of it. They say he was determined. He took his GED in order to enter the Army as soon as possible, his mother said.

Then halfway through basic training, Matthew was sent home with stress fractures in his legs. He spent his month of recovery anxious to get back and disappointed he wouldn’t be graduating with the soldiers he started with. His mom says he carried that loyalty to the battlefield.

Matthew was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Carson, Colorado.

Captain John L. Hallett III, 30, of California was one of four soldiers killed in Afghanistan August 25, when an improvised explosive device exploded near the vehicle he was traveling in.

John graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York before marrying his wife Lisa in 2004, three weeks before he left for a 13-month tour in Iraq. The couple has two sons, Jackson, 4, and Bryce, 2. Lisa is also from Concord, though she now lives in DuPont, Washington, just outside Fort Lewis, where Hallett's Stryker brigade was based.

The Army released a statement from his wife Friday afternoon. "Captain John Louis Hallett III was an amazing father, devoted and joyful husband, thoughtful son, loving brother, and inspiring friend. ... He was a patient teacher to our children.

"He had the warmest and most genuine smile. John would always make people laugh by his clever ways and kind humor ..."

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

Another U.S. Army Captain, Cory J. Jenkins, 30, of Arizona, also died in Afghanistan when the vehicle the soldiers were traveling in was struck by an IED August 25.

Cory leaves behind a wife, Brooke, and 2-month-old daughter, Reagan. He spent a month with his daughter before deploying to Afghanistan five weeks ago, his father said. He and his family were living in Steilacoom, Washington, near Fort Lewis, where he was a Scoutmaster in his LDS Church ward before his deployment, his father said. The soldier was an active member of the LDS Church and had served a mission to Russia. He graduated from BYU with a bachelor's degree in conservation biology, said BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins, and is the third former BYU student to die in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

Sergeant 1st Class Ronald W. Sawyer, 38, of Trenton, Missouri, is the third listed casualty in Afghanistan who died in the vehicle explosion August 25.

Ron Sawyer served in many locations during his military career, including Fort Carson, Fort Hood, Kaiserslautum, Germany; Los Angeles Recruiting Battalion; Camp Kasey, Korea; and Fort Lewis. His overseas service time includes three years in Germany, a one-year tour in Korea, and deployments to Kosovo and Cuba.

His awards and decorations include the Army Commendation Medal (six awards), Army Achievement Medal (eight awards), Joint Meritorious Unit Award, Army Superior Unit Award, U.S. Coast Guard Meritorious Unit Commendation, Army Good Conduct Medal (five awards), National Defense Service Medal (two awards), Korea Defense Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Kosovo Campaign Medal with Bronze Service Star, Global War on Terror Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, NCO Professional Develop-ment Ribbon (three awards), Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon, NATO Medal, US Army Recruiter Badge-Gold with two Sapphire Achievement Stars, Expert Field Medical Badge, and the Drivers and Mechanics Badge.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

24-year old Army Private first-class Dennis M. Williams of of Federal Way, Washington, was killed in Afghanistan on Tuesday, one month into his first deployment. The details aren't clear. We know that he, along with three others from Fort Lewis' Stryker Brigade, was killed by an improvised explosive device in Southern Afghanistan.

His older brother David Williams said of Dennis, "I feel robbed." "I'm so confused, I don't hardly know my own name," his grandmother Kathy Anderson said.

Over a recent 11 days, six soldiers from Fort Lewis were killed in Afghanistan. The scene in Dennis Williams' home is the same one being seen all over the nation as the U.S. ramps up its fight against the Taliban.

Dennis is a 2003 graduate of Federal Way High School. After school he had a job in the IT department of Poulsbo RV and then became a security guard at Fisher Plaza in Seattle. His brother David says Dennis was very proud of that job, and that he looked sharp in his uniform. "That's when it started to grind on him," his brother said. "Denny" as he was known to his family, really wanted to enlist.

He was also assigned to the 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, Washington.

Marine Lance Corporal Donald J. Hogan, 20, of San Clemente, California, died August 26 while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He joined the Marines soon after graduating in 2007 from Tesoro High School, where he ran cross country.

"He was like most kids, in that he just enjoyed his life without a lot of concern about the future," Donald's father Jim Hogan told a reporter via email. "He had planned on making a career out of the Marines. He had told me that his goal was to attain or surpass my father's rank of Gunnery Sergeant." Donald's grandfather, James Hogan Sr., retired from the Marine Corps as a gunnery sergeant. He was a veteran of three wars – World War II, Korean and Vietnam.

Donald talked about his desire to walk in his grandfather's footsteps. He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, California.

Corporal Darby T. Morin, 25, of Victoria, Canada, died August 22 in Logar province, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained during a vehicle rollover.

Sgt. Morin was the nephew of Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Vice-Chief Lyle Whitefish, who told reporters, "You never think it would happen," Mr. Whitefish said. "Of course he was at risk every day, but a lot of young men and women come home. Unfortunately, others don't, and he was one that didn't."

Sgt. Morin and his wife, Veronica, had two sons, Christian, 3, and Blue Sky, 19 months. "He was a great father and he loved his wife and his children," Mr. Whitefish said. "He was very compassionate." Sgt. Morin decided to join the U.S. Army immediately after graduating from Big River First Nation High School came from an admiration for its advanced technology, according to his uncle.

He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, New York.

Staff Sergeant Andrew T. Lobosco, 29, of Somerville, New Jersey, died August 22 in Yakhchal, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit.

A of his mother Bonnie Lobosco, Nancy Kopin, a neighbor and friend of the family, told reporters that Bonnie spoke of her son often and described him as a "wonderful" and "happy-go-lucky guy." "A mother has to have this possibility in the back of her mind when her son goes to war, but you never think it's going to happen so close to home," Kopin said this afternoon, fighting back tears.

Andrew Lobosco was not in a relationship, Kopin said, but had previously said he wanted to get married and have children because he was the last man in his family to carry on the Lobosco name.

Recent stories on Americans who paid the ultimate price fighting in the wars overseas:

From August 24 2009: Casualties Mounting From Fighting Overseas

From August 1, 2009: Marine Casualties Heighten in Afghanistan

From July 24, 2009: Minnesota Pays Heavy Price in Latest War Casualty Reports - Tim King Salem-News.com

From July 18, 2009: Oregon Marine Among Casualties From Afghanistan - Tim King Salem-News.com

From July 12, 2009: Costly Fighting in Afghanistan Leads to Three More Combat Deaths - Tim King Salem-News.com

From July 6th 2009: Two Soldiers and One Marine Killed Fighting in Afghanistan - Salem-News.com

From July 2nd 2009: Almost 50 U.S. Casualties in Iraq & Afghanistan Reported in June - Tim King Salem-News.com

From June 21st 2009: IED's Blamed in at Least Half of Latest Iraq and Afghanistan War Casualties - Tim King Salem-News.com

From June 7th 2009: Rate of American Casualties in Iraq & Afghanistan Accelerates - Tim King Salem-News.com

From June 2nd 2009: War Casualties Mounting in Iraq & Afghanistan - Tim King Salem-News.com

From May 24th 2009: Average Age Among 11 Recent War Casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan is 32 - Tim King Salem-News.com

From May 11th 2009: Five Americans Killed in Baghdad by Fellow U.S. Army Soldier - Salem-News.com

From May 5th 2009: Two California Soldiers Killed in Iraq - Tim King Salem-News.com

From May 4th 2009: Two Soldiers Killed and One Missing in Action in Afghanistan - Salem-News.com

From April 20th 2009: The Faces of Four Americans Killed in Iraq and Afghanistan - Salem-News.com

From May 2nd 2009: Deaths in Iraq Jump: 6 Americans Killed in Recent Days - Tim King Salem-News.com

From April 12th 2009: Five Soldiers Killed by VBIED in Iraq Among Latest Casualties - Tim King Salem-News.com

From April 7th 2009: More Casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq - Tim King Salem-News.com

From March 29th 2009: Two U.S. Navy Officers Killed by Insurgent Posing as Afghan Soldier - Tim King Salem-News.com

From March 24th 2009: More Marines and Soldiers Pay the Ultimate Price in Afghanistan and Iraq - Tim King Salem-News.com

=====================================================

Sources:

The OEF Page

IraqWarHeroes.org.

Department of Defense

U.S. Government: Statistical information about casualties of the Vietnam War

Orlando Sentinel/Haney family

Statesman Journal

Anchorage Daily News

Dallas NBC

Daily Kos

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Tim King is a former U.S. Marine with twenty years of experience on the west coast as a television news producer, photojournalist, reporter and assignment editor. In addition to his role as a war correspondent, this Los Angeles native serves as Salem-News.com's Executive News Editor.
Tim spent the winter of 2006/07 covering the war in Afghanistan, and he was in Iraq over the summer of 2008, reporting from the war while embedded with both the U.S. Army and the Marines. Tim holds numerous awards for reporting, photography, writing and editing, including the Oregon AP Award for Spot News Photographer of the Year (2004), the first place Electronic Media Award in Spot News, Las Vegas, (1998), Oregon AP Cooperation Award (1991); and several other awards including the 2005 Red Cross Good Neighborhood Award for reporting. Serving the community in very real terms, Salem-News.com is the nation's only truly independent high traffic news Website, affiliated with Google News and several other major search engines and news aggregators.
You can send Tim an email at this address: newsroom@salem-news.com




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Tonya Bazany September 9, 2009 10:29 pm (Pacific time)

Christopher Baltazar was one of my daughter's best friends and it saddens me that he is no longer with us. Mr. President, please see that we've lost too many already and bring our soldiers home.


Samantha. September 9, 2009 10:13 pm (Pacific time)

Christopher Shawn Baltazar... i-i don't know what to say really... you were truly an amazing person. you have an amazing soul combined with the heart of a fighter. every time i saw your picture, heard your voice, got a text, talked to you... whatever it was... i was always in a better mood. so, i've liked a couple guys here and there, but i've never had them mean so much to me. you may be the only one that makes me cry so much, but that's only because i care so much and you were also the only one who could make me so happy in a short instance. i love you so much more than these words could ever begin to say. you mean the world and so much more to me. it shatters my heart into 945239076 pieces when i even begin to think about what happened. you're the only person who can make me feel so happy about everything. when i say i love you, it's not just a sentence, it's coming from the very bottom of my heart. i keep pauseing before i type it and just smile and think about you. you are in my head every moment of the day and that's not an exaggeration. these are just words and they seem to be flowing from my head... i'm thinking of so many things I can't even write them all down in time. you're amazing and perfect to me in every way, there is no convincing me otherwise. basically what i'm trying to say here is... I love you and I miss you, truly. Love, Samantha.


Tears for 25... September 9, 2009 8:10 pm (Pacific time)

My deepest condolences. No words are good enough, but our prayers are with all the friends and families of these fallen. Too many...

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©2018 Salem-News.com. All opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Salem-News.com.


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